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As a trustee for coastal resources, NOAA protects and restores habitats injured by hazardous waste sites, oil spills and vessel groundings.   RSS Feed RSS Feed
 
Restore The Gulf
 
A view of response ships at the source of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, a month after the rig exploded and sank, tragically claiming the lives of 11 people. (NOAA)

A view of response ships at
the source of the Deepwater
Horizon oil spill in the Gulf
of Mexico, a month after the rig
exploded and sank, tragically
claiming the lives of 11 people. (NOAA).

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Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Five Years Later

April 2015 - Five years ago, an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon Macondo oil well drilling platform started the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history, releasing millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Tragically, 11 people lost their lives due to the explosion. NOAA was on the scene from the earliest moments of the crisis, bringing more than 20 years of experience protecting and restoring our coasts from oil spills.

This month, five years after the spill, we are looking back at the early restoration that has been completed to date, and we'll provide a glimpse of what the public can expect to see as early restoration continues. Our new interactive map presents the locations and descriptions of early restoration projects across the Gulf, and our continuing blog posts and stories recount the response and assessment efforts since the spill and lessons learned for future spills.

 

 

 


The Bound Brook, a tributary to the Raritan River, is adjacent to the Cornell-Dubilier Electronics Site

The Bound Brook, a tributary to the
Raritan River, is adjacent to the
Cornell-Dubilier Electronics Site. (NOAA).


$4.485 Million Settlement for Natural Resource Injuries at the Cornell-Dubilier Electronics, Inc. Superfund Site in South Plainfield, NJ

March 2015 - On February 24, 2015, the United States entered into a settlement agreement with D.S.C. of Newark, the owner of the property where the Cornell-Dubilier Electronics, Inc., facility operated. The $22 million settlement includes $4.485 million to compensate for injuries to natural resources in Bound Brook and its associated wetlands and floodplains including lost use of the recreational fishery since 1997, when the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP) issued a ban on consumption of all species of fish in Bound Brook due to polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination.

Cornell-Dubilier Electronics, Inc., manufactured electronic parts and components and tested transformer oils at their facility in South Plainfield, NJ, from 1936 to 1962 and disposed of PCB-contaminated material directly into an unnamed stream that flows half a mile into Bound Brook, a tributary to the Raritan River. Hundreds of acres of wetlands and stream bottom were contaminated with PCBs and other contaminants. Funds available from this and other settlements of natural resource injury related to releases from this Superfund Site will be used to restore natural resources. NOAA and our co-Trustees, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the NJDEP, are evaluating opportunities for natural resource restoration in the Raritan River watershed and will seek public input during restoration planning.



Aerial Map illustration showing the restoration site at the Kerr-McKee former wood-treatment processing plant in Navassa, North Carolina. (NOAA)

Aerial Map illustration showing
the restoration site at the
Kerr-McKee former wood-treatment
processing plant in Navassa, North
Carolina. (NOAA).


NOAA and Trustees Receive Over $22 million to Restore Natural Resources Harmed by Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. in Navassa, NC

February 2015 - On Friday January 23, 2015 the $5.15 billion settlement with Anadarko Petroleum Corporation for environmental and tort claims went into effect. This is the largest environmental settlement ever brought by the United States government and resolves a fraudulent conveyance lawsuit pursued by the Department of Justice. From this settlement NOAA, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the State of North Carolina will receive more than $22 million for natural resource damages for releases from the Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp. site in Navassa, NC.

Damages to natural resources were the result of creosote-wood treating that took place on the site from the 1930s until the mid-1970s. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the wood treating have been found at elevated levels in on-site soils, groundwater and Sturgeon Creek sediments, which provide important habitat for fish, birds, and other wildlife.

Read the press release.




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