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As a trustee for coastal resources, NOAA protects and restores habitats injured by hazardous waste sites, oil spills and vessel groundings.   RSS Feed RSS Feed
 
Restore The Gulf
 
Dolphins are seen swimming through the oil spilling from the Deepwater Horizon oil well at the height of the spill in 2010. (NOAA)

Dolphins are seen swimming
through the oil spilling from
the Deepwater Horizon oil well at
the height of the spill in 2010. (NOAA)
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Latest NOAA Study Ties Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill to Spike in Gulf Dolphin Deaths

May 20, 2015 - Scientists have found more evidence connecting bottlenose dolphin deaths along the northern Gulf of Mexico to the same signs of illness found in animals exposed to petroleum products, as reported in the peer-reviewed online journal PLOS ONE. Linking to a non-federal government web site. This link does not imply endorsement.

This latest study uncovered that an unusually high number of dead Gulf dolphins had what are normally rare lesions on their lungs and hormone-producing adrenal glands. The timing, location, and nature of the lesions support that oil compounds from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill caused these lesions and contributed to the high numbers of dolphin deaths within this oil spill's footprint.

See NOAA's Press Release for more information.

 


The former coal tar processing facility pier. (BBL Inc.)

The former coal tar processing
facility pier. (BBL Inc.)

Island End River, Massachusetts Draft Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment Released for Public Comment

On May 11, 2015, NOAA released a Draft Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment, opening a public comment period, for the former coal tar processing facility adjacent to the Island End River in Everett, Massachusetts.

The Draft Restoration Plan identifies and evaluates a range of restoration alternatives that will restore the sub-tidal habitat and aquatic species that were significantly impacted from wastewater discharge in the river. The preferred restoration project will restore salt marsh habitat to address fish species injuries resulting from the hazardous waste release.

From the 1890s to the late 1950s, coal tar produced from a manufactured gas plant was released to adjacent soil, groundwater, sediment, and surface water, including the tidally influenced Island End River. Tar deposits impacted aquatic habitat for bottom-dwelling organisms and fish that use this tidal river habitat.

NOAA will accept public comments through June 19, 2015. For more information, contact eric.hutchins@noaa.gov.

 


T/V MARGARA aground with tugs alongside on April 27, 2006. (PRDNER)

T/V MARGARA aground with tugs
alongside on April 27, 2006.
(PRDNER)

T/V MARGARA Vessel Grounding Final Primary Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment Released

On May 9, 2015, NOAA and The Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources working on the restoration of natural resources injured by the T/V MARGARA vessel grounding released a Final Primary Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment.

The Plan identifies the primary restoration project selected to complete the on-site restoration needed for recovery of the coral resources, other reef biota and habitat significantly injured by the grounding. The selected primary restoration project involves the placement of limestone and/or large boulders on top of the rubble, followed by active transplantation of corals on the substrates. The proposed plan will stabilize the rubble, return topographic complexity to the site, and accelerate the biological recovery of the injured species.

This restoration project will be accomplished in two phases. Upon completion, the site will be monitored at scheduled intervals for 10 years to ensure the structural stability of the restoration features, the survival and stability of the transplanted corals, to document recovery is occurring and to identify corrective actions, if needed.

 



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